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Are Ethics Guiding Your Workplace?

Author: Yokubaitis, Pamela R.

Source: Journal of AHIMA

Publication Date: September 2003



Sanctions under the HIPAA regulations mean serious financial consequences for healthcare professionals who release protected health information to others without following proper disclosure protocols. But HIM professionals should not be motivated by fear of financial consequences alone. Ou....

Spoliation of Medical Evidence

Author: Tomes, Jonathan P.

Source: Journal of AHIMA

Publication Date: October 2005


To avoid the improper destruction or alteration of records, HIM departments must follow a retention schedule, train personnel, and ensure that corrections leave original entries intact.
Although the legal concept known as spoliation of evidence has been a part of the American legal syste....

Blue-ribbon Approach to Compliance

Author: Meaney, Mark E.

Source: Journal of AHIMA

Publication Date: September 2001

The seeds of today’s compliance movement were first sown 60 years ago in a one-car shed in Palo Alto, CA. With a mere $538 in start-up capital, Bill Hewlett and David Packard launched a high-tech revolution and created a bellwether of the modern economy when they founded Hewlett-Packard (HP).
....

Components of Occupational Health Information Systems

Author: Lynch, John J

Source: Journal of AMRA

Publication Date: January 1986

Four databases are essential to the effectiveness of an occupational health information system. These are: job history, work site exposure, environmental agents and health and safety information. The most frequently cited elements of each data base are presented, as are the factors common to successful occupational health information systems.

Standards and Guidelines for Occupational Health Recordkeeping

Author: Lynch, John J

Source: Journal of AMRA

Publication Date: February 1986

The occupational health record guidelines and standards of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the American Occupational Medical Association, the American Medical Association, and the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses are reviewed. These guidelines and standards are, for the most part, consistent with health record content and format in other health care settings.

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